beyond the photo mode. how video games use photography as a narrative device

SPOILER WARNING: this article contains spoilers for the following games: “Life is Strange”, “Virginia”, “1979 Revolution: Black Friday”. If you intend to play any of those you may want to come back to this article later. Otherwise you’ve been warned.

once i was a teenage girl who shot polaroid and then used the photos to travel back in time. then i was an FBI detective who developed a roll of film to get evidence. then in 1979 i roamed the streets of Tehran with my camera documenting the Iranian revolution as it happened.

as strange as it may seem, all these stories really happened. the only trick here is that they didn’t happen in real life, i lived them in video games.

Continue reading “beyond the photo mode. how video games use photography as a narrative device”

Visual overload

I don’t feel the energy to take pictures. Or is it laziness? I’ve been thinking about it for a long time and never could nail it. I love photography, I want to shoot or rather I would like to do it but instead I’m just doing other things. Podcasting, streaming, board gaming, reading etc but not shooting pictures.

Does it mean I’m burnt out or just my dedication and love for photography were not true? Why don’t I feel that tinkling every time I think about developing film or scanning it? What’s wrong?

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Ads ruined Instagram for me

Right at the top I want to be clear that I’m not against ads on the internet in general, I know why we need them and what they do. What I want to make my point about is the level of tolerance.

Now, let me go back a little and give you the context. For the last several months I’ve been mostly using Instagram for my social media fix, and for posting too, as you can easily guess by the date of my previous post here. I love the concept of Instagram, and I would even argue that it is a better platform for me to share whatever I shoot these days. It’s quicker and simpler and it’s photo oriented.

But today is the day I start drifting away from Instagram and the reason is ads. I don’t remember when they started popping up in my feed, I couldn’t care less for them. Occasionally, I would even stop scrolling and watch them a bit, and for some time seeing ads was fine with me. Untill I noticed a thing, or rather the thing. I saw that now I tend to see too many promotions when I scroll down to catch up with my feed. I got curious and actually counted how often they appear.

Every 3 posts. Three. I don’t know about you, but to me it seems a bit too much. At some point, especially if I look through a day worth of posts, I get the feeling I see only ads.

This discovery made me decide to leave Instagram or at least use it less, which is a great bummer considering my love for the idea. I strongly believe that Facebook have gone a little too far in their greed attempt to keep Instagram free and yet profitable.

Now, when I’m on my way out, there are only two platforms left that didn’t disappoint me yet. Those are WordPress and Twitter. Though I’ve always had troubles figuring out Twitter, I see how it can be a place for me to share my photography and more importantly connect with people. As for the WP, the whole insta debacle reminded me how great the Reader feature is, and that on mobile it even resembles a social media feed.

So this is it. As much as I would like to use Instagram, my tolerance for the number of ads was abused and I don’t feel like coming to terms with this. I’ve practically left Facebook years ago and didn’t feel any need to come back, but with Instagram the break up is not going to be that easy.

Things you see when hiking in a desert


Olympus 35DC, Fujicolor Superia X-tra 800.Elifaz, 2016.
One of the greatest leisure activities we have in our desert is hiking. Because it’s scorchingly hot from June to September, it’s only in autumn and spring when we really can enjoy this. But when we do go out it is an …

Continue reading – http://bit.ly/2FfdMZe

What about those mannequins anyway?

Olympus 35DC, Fujicolor Superia X-tra 800. Eilat, 2017.
The juxtaposition of people and mannequins is quite a popular trope. After all, there’s a lot of symbolism as well as parallelism when you put a real person next to a plastic human-shape object. We’ve seen it many times in many…

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Lightroom alternative for a film shooter?

 

Several months ago I’ve subscribed to Adobe’s photography package with Lightroom and Photoshop included. At the time the idea of having both magnificent photo tools for only $9.99 a month seemed quite legitimate, but after some time using or should I rather say NOT using this software I faced a dilemma.

As I’m shooting mostly film and hardly ever edit my photos, say nothing about post-processing in Ps, the question I came up with is quite simple: do I really need this software? When I mentioned not using Lightroom and Photoshop I meant not using them to their full potential or at least to some reasonable extent. To be honest, I didn’t care about Photoshop from the beginning, I just accepted the fact it came as a bundle with the tool I really needed or thought I did. Lightroom was my main focus and it is a great product without a doubt.

After working with it for some time I realised that the most useful features for me were cataloging and direct export to my blog or Flickr. All those amazing editing capabilities and stuff most of the time were left aside unless I was working with my rare digital pictures.

To add more fuel to my Lightroom controversy were several articles and blogs on the topic with some alternative suggestions. And while most of the blogs were full of rightful criticism towards Adobe and their products, almost none of them were by film shooters and the alternatives mentioned played into digital yard anyway leaving me wondering.

The last nail in this coffin was Adobe’s announcement of Lightroom CC and Classic CC. I’m sure they have their own sane reasons to do it but for me, it became really hard to justify why I need Lightroom at all as I’m definitely out of Adobe’s focus audience.

For the meantime, it seems I’ll continue using it as I don’t have any alternative in mind and I’m on a one-year commitment plan.

But I’m really curious about what tools film photographers use instead of Lr and Ps. If you’ve got any advice or ideas please do share them in the comments.

Thanks.